“I have a vivid memory of standing by a muddy road on a dark December afternoon in 1995, when I was chatting with two friends, one a Bosnian Muslim, the other a Bosnian Serb. We were all in the Bosnian city of Tuzla, working on CNN’s coverage of a war that had already claimed 100,000 lives and displaced millions — the worst conflict in Europe since World War II. The warring parties had just signed the U.S.-brokered Dayton Accords meant to put an end to three years of carnage.

I asked them whether they thought peace would hold, and they nearly winced at the question. But they agreed that everyone — Bosnia’s Muslims, Serbs and Croats — were tired of fighting. That alone would allow the agreement to hold.” (Washington Post)